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Insights from creative hairdressing judge, Sally Brooks

Cathy Davys recently interviewed our creative hairdressing judge Sally Brooks, co-owner of Brooks & Brooks salon in Holborn, London. She’s won some 60 awards with her creative team including London Hairdresser of the Year three times.

Cathy asked her about preparing for competitions, what inspires her, and what she looks for as a judge. Read the full interview below to see what Sally had to say..

You were named British Hairdresser of the Year in 2020, what inspired your collection?

You can imagine being nominated for an award when you’re in the middle of lockdown and you say “How on Earth do I do something?”

I try to always shoot a collection of pictures that I feel represents how the industry is feeling. Every collection I do is completely different – I don’t have one style or one way of doing it. It’s really where my head is at a time. 

I’ve wanted to shoot mannequin heads for quite a long time and this seemed like the right time to do it.

Lockdown is actually doing something quite creative. I think as hairdressers our creativity is something that keeps us going.

How do you prepare for photographic competitions?

I usually have an idea of a feeling or an idea of which direction I want to go, but sometimes I just like to challenge myself. 

Awards force you to take that idea in your head and put it on a piece of paper. Whereas the idea sometimes can just sit in the back of your head for months. It’s forcing you to actually do the idea that’s in your head.

There are different ways that I work and different channels that I get creativity from and different ways. I set myself budgets and I stick to them. This year was all about spending no money, and sometimes that is more important to me than winning something. It’s actually setting myself something and seeing if I can deliver what’s in my head.

What do you look for as a judge of photographic competition?

There are so many amazing hairdressers across the whole world. But what I’m looking for really is something that captures the imagination of what we’re feeling. Or it’s that one hairstyle that makes you look not just twice, but three times at it.

Do you recommend people enter competitions?

I don’t think it’s a must, but I do think it’s a discipline. I honestly feel that it’s really, really not about winning something, but it is about challenging yourself. It’s a deadline, and it forces you to try something different, and it teaches you a different discipline.

It’s one thing creating a hairstyle in front of you, but it’s another thing putting it in print, and that is a completely different discipline.

So yes, I do think it’s good to enter awards, and I do think it’s good to be told it’s not good enough.

How should someone get started in competition work?

Don’t spend loads of money. It’s not a money competition. If you wanted to enter a competition, you could shoot it on your phone. I do. I honestly believe if you have got a great model with great hair, simplify everything around it so that the hair pops.

We are in a whole different era at the moment where I feel it’s very, very exciting to try new things as we come out of a pandemic and a lockdown across the whole world.

It’s a time to allow the youngsters to have a voice. It’s time to come out with new ideas and new ways of working.

Have you had many mentors and what have they done for you?

Mentors are really important, and I think it depends on what somebody says a mentor is. I still feel like I’m being mentored at the moment by my team, because anytime somebody challenges you or teaches you something, that to me is a mentor. I’ve had amazing people that I’ve surrounded myself with, and we all have a beautiful relationship in this industry because the one common factor that we all have is a passion for our craft.

It is really important to surround yourself with people that are passionate about their craft, passionate about their industry, and passionate about caring about the craft of the industry that will mentor you through your career. If you surround yourself with negative people, people that aren’t as good as you, you’re not going to get better.

What’s inspiring you right now?

I think probably what inspires me at the moment is that I had a chance to sit back and think. I’ve never had children so I’ve never had a sabbatical. I’ve never had time off.

I’m not saying I enjoyed lockdown, but it was a chance for me to try different creative things.

I tried doing pottery, I tried painting, I tried different things. And I think what inspires me at the moment are the people that have used the time wisely to learn something new to keep their positive energy. I think I’m really inspired by that type of person at the moment, and it’s probably made me look at things a little bit differently.

Tough times and challenging times can make you stronger and can also make new avenues for creativity. Take each day as it comes. Get up in the morning, be really positive. Put a smile on your face and whatever gets thrown at you, suck it up. That’s my advice.

Insights from creative hairdressing judge, Richard Kavanagh

Cathy Davys recently had the honour of chatting with Richard Kavanagh, an internationally renowned hairdresser with years of experience and knowledge to share. Richard has worked on hundreds of fashion shows around the world touring with some of the industry’s best. He’s also shot magazine covers for Vogue, Vanity Fair, Harpers Bizarre, Elle Magazine and more.

On top of being well suited for the job as a creative judge in The Industry Awards this year, he’s also got some great advice for creating amazing images. Keep reading to pick up some tips on photoshoots, what makes award-winning images, and more!

Can you share a little bit of your journey with us?

I started hairdressing as an apprentice in Brown's Bay in Auckland in a small suburban salon. I finished my apprenticeship in Devonport and worked in salons around the country until I really decided to focus on my career. I chose the best salon I could possibly work at in Auckland with a bunch of award-winning killers and just surrounded myself with the very, very best people so that I could accelerate my career.

I started entering competitions after about ten years of hairdressing, because I felt that I had to build my craft and some skill so that I had something to showcase, but I probably should have entered a bit earlier.

Once I started entering competitions, I really found a passion for growing my skill and expanding my repertoire, and a drive for improving my understanding of techniques and methods. Photographic competitions really gave me a taste for what it was like to work in the industry beyond the salon.

What would be your advice to young people on where to start with photographic hair images?

My number one piece of advice is—and this is going to sound a little bit weird— try not to think about it like a hairdresser, because when you’re creating a photograph for a photographic entry, whilst the hair is the showcase of your craft and your skill, the vehicle that portrays the hair is the photographic image.

So think about the hierarchy of information from the top-down. When you’re creating an image, first and foremost, it's about the photograph, so think about composition, light, etc. Second of all, think about the model that you're using, how photogenic are they, and what’s the best way you can present them so that they look as close to how you imagine they will look when you build your concept out.

And then once you've got those, start thinking about how you're going to execute the hair, the makeup, the wardrobe, etc. When it comes to hair in the salon, the primary
focus is the hair that's going to walk out the door, but when it comes to doing a photoshoot, the primary result is the photographic image, and the hair is only a part of the end result.

What’s the one “wow” thing you’re looking for as a judge?

So when I'm judging, I'm looking at all the images across the board and I'm comparing them to each other. What I'm looking for is a pop, something that stands out. I know that sounds very vague, but it’s when all the elements come together in a kind of an interesting harmony or juxtaposition.

That doesn't mean when the hair has lots of different things going on, what it means is when the image speaks, because what we're doing as judges is looking at a bunch of images and the things that pop out. We're not looking at the details first, we're looking at the image. We’re asking “Does it speak to me?”, “Does it say something to me emotionally?”, “Do I connect with it as an image?”, and then that’s when I look in at the hair.

Why do you think people should enter?

I think entering competitions has benefits on numerous levels. When I started trying to do something with my career, entering competitions gave me a way to benchmark myself against other hairdressers, to benchmark my skills against myself, and to have a tangible outcome or result that I could look at and then go, okay, how could I do better next time?

So it gives you a way of improving yourself and growing your skills that's not abstract. It's not based on whether somebody likes you or doesn't like you. It helps you get really analytical with yourself and go, okay, what did I do? What's one thing I’d do differently if I did it again?

It gives you a way to grow and improve technically, conceptually and contextually. So when we do hair, we don't just do hair in isolation. Hair is not just hair that doesn't have any context to it. In the salon, the context is the person who's wearing your hair. In a competition, it's the other competitors and the judges, and the rules and the framework of the competition.

Doing competitions allows you to get a little more context. And when you go back into the salon and do your salon work, you have a better way of relating to your clients. You have a better way of serving your clients because you have a greater context to the medium you're working in.

And then the third thing is, obviously, the better you do, the more accolades you get, the more rewards you get, the more valuable you are to your clients, your boss, your salon, and ultimately yourself.

I started doing competitions in the 90s, and I still submit an entry to the Australian Session Stylist of the Year. I still enter that because it gives me an opportunity to check myself and reflect on my career, and it gives me a measure outside of just the daily doing. So I think it's super-valuable to enter competitions.

What advice would you give to young hairdressers starting out in photographic competitions?

I think when you're starting out, you don't know where to look. My very first photographic competition, I thought a photographer was a photographer. So I just went down the road and spoke to the local portrait photographer and got some of my friends who I knew were up for helping me, and it turned out to be completely awful!

But what I learned from that was, not any photographer is a fashion or beauty photographer.
You need to find a photographer who is interested in, and has an eye for fashion and beauty. You might end up with somebody who has an eye for landscapes and backgrounds, but doesn't know how to light a face or how to shape light on the face.

There’s a number of things you can do when looking for a photographer. There are always photographers who want to collaborate, and social media makes that a whole lot easier now. You'll often find that people who are starting out in their career, young photographers, people learning and studying photography, who want to take pictures and they want to have great subject matter to take pictures of. So go to your local tech or photography course and see who’s keen.

Because I've had to think about these things a lot over the years and answer these questions for a lot of people, I've actually built a course to teach people how to prepare for photo shoots. It covers things like how to put together a team, how to produce a shoot, how to build a mood board, how to understand how the camera sees the hair and how to manipulate hair for the camera, specifically, how to create any energy and movement in the hair.

What do you see trending?

There's a couple of ways you can go when you're looking at creating imagery - and one of those is very trend-based. Social media today is the best place to see emerging trends and current trends. But to really see them, you need to pull back a little bit and view it from a 30,000-foot view, so you can get a better idea of the flavour of the moment.

About 15 years ago I used to work on the show circuit. We would do New York, Milan and Paris, and we do about 45-50 shows a season. At the end of the season, we would sit down as a team and we would look through all the looks that we'd done, and you'd see the certain trends that would emerge. And you’d know that they would become the trends for the season because my director would speak about them, and then the media would then write about them. The world has changed since then, we don't really have the same kind of hair trends. We have this general kind of aesthetic or sensibility more in a social context of what the trends are.

I think what we find today is that there are two polar opposites when it comes to trends. On the one side, there's the very timeless, raw, natural, “norm core”, a very New Zealand aesthetic that’s a slightly weird, slightly nerdy, slightly unique kind of aesthetic.

And then at the other end of that, you've got this kind of 90’s glam aesthetic that's coming back through, which is harder light, more makeup, more of a blowout, more polished, a bit more elevated and glam. I think currently those are the two ends of the spectrum when it comes to trends.

My personal advice if you're doing competitions is to try and create a look that you can look back on in ten years and go, “Wow, I like it still, even today”.

One of the best photographers I ever worked with, he always said to me: “Well do you like it?” I came to him once with this look that I was super proud of technically, because I’d managed to do something I’d never done before, and he asked me that question. It really made me think about the whole look because even though I was proud of myself for achieving something, it was still really important that at the end of the day, it was a good look.

Do you have any mentors?

Absolutely. My mentors over the years have been both accidental and intentional. I've had mentors for specific skills like on stage presentation work, business, just in hair, and more. One of my biggest mentors was Guido, who if you haven’t heard of before I suggest you look up, he is basically the Vidal Sassoon of our era. Just being around somebody of that calibre changes the way you look at your work, think about your work and think about hair.

Mentors are a super important thing. Even when I first started doing hairdressing competitions, I had mentors within the salon. I looked at the guys who were doing well at awards or who had experience entering awards, and I would ask for their advice.

To watch the highlights from Cathy and Richards chat head over to The Industry Awards Instagram page!

Meet The Industry Awards training judges

The Industry Awards team are excited to introduce you to the four training judges on our panel this year!

We're honoured to have so many talented judges on board, all bringing with them years of experience and dedication to training in our industry. Keep reading to find out more about them.

Kim Ryan – Owner, Advanced Derma Care 

Trained nurse and beauty therapist Kim Ryan has worked in the beauty industry for over 25 years, winning numerous awards for training and business development along the way. Kim and her husband Paul since founded Advanced Derma Care where Kim is the lead in product selection and training.

Kim was formerly the President of the New Zealand Association of Registered Beauty Therapists, striving for safe practice and continuous education for all beauty therapists. It’s no surprise Kim is a sought-after beauty expert, having written for a number of magazines, including NZ Beauty, Headway, Mindfood, M2 Woman and Simply Beauty.

Kim has loved seeing the increase in entries from beauty therapists and can’t wait to see the talent in store this year.

 

Rebecca Brent – Owner, Willis York 

Rebecca Brent is one of New Zealand’s most influential hair colourists, with over twenty years of styling experience. With over ten years in the L’Oréal Professionnel artistic team she has carved out a niche for creative colour work and exceptional education seminars. By experimenting and pushing the boundaries with L’Oreal colour, she has majorly shaped the New Zealand colour scene with her hand painted pastel work, coined colour recipes and beautiful imagery.

Rebecca is the director/owner of iconic salon Willis York in Wellington. With a loyal following, Rebecca and the team at Willis York are renowned for inspirational hair work, as well as producing award winning, original thinking hair experts.

She continually gives back to the industry by hosting and curating fashion and design events and can’t wait to judge with this year’s panel.

 

Katrina Herbert – Owner, The Capital Barber 

Kat began her journey as a hairdressing apprentice at just 15 years old. After completing her qualification under the tutelage of David Bendell, she became a contractor stylist in the Wellington region, later opening her own salon in Petone. Kat thoroughly enjoyed hairdressing and the opportunities it offered, particularly training young professionals to help them gain their qualifications.

With a passion for cutting and styling men’s hair, Kat diversified her skills, training in barbering and men’s grooming in 2005 and positioning herself as senior barber at Monsignors Barber Shop. In 2015 Kat opened her own inner-city barber shop in Wellington, The Capital Barber, offering corporate professionals a first-class barbering experience. With both barbering and hairdressing under her belt, Kat is the perfect trainer to her apprentices.

Kat is looking forward to being part of the judging team and can’t wait to scout new talent.

 

Mana Dave – Blaze 

Mana Dave is an award-winning hairstylist and platform artist from Auckland. Mana loves the creativity and people focus of hairdressing, particularly his ability to make people look and feel good. He is the artistic director and owner of celebrated salon, Blaze, where he and his forward-thinking team are dedicated to training, upskilling, and mastering the latest trends.

His passion for hair colour and commitment to education and training has positioned him as a powerful figure in the hairdressing industry.

Owning two successful salon brands, Mana understands the significance of both technical skills and business acumen. For him, great hair colour is achieved through a good consultation and strategic colour placement.

Mana first joined the judging panel for the training awards last year and is excited to be returning again to see the ever-growing talent in our industries!

 

Entries close November 1! Make sure to follow us on Instagram and Facebook to stay up to date with the latest news from The Industry Awards.

Meet The Industry Awards creative barbering judges

The Industry Awards team are excited to introduce you to the four training judges on our panel this year!

We're honoured to have so many talented judges on board, all bringing with them years of experience and dedication to training in our industry. Keep reading to find out more about them.

Kim Ryan – Owner, Advanced Derma Care 

Trained nurse and beauty therapist Kim Ryan has worked in the beauty industry for over 25 years, winning numerous awards for training and business development along the way. Kim and her husband Paul since founded Advanced Derma Care where Kim is the lead in product selection and training.

Kim was formerly the President of the New Zealand Association of Registered Beauty Therapists, striving for safe practice and continuous education for all beauty therapists. It’s no surprise Kim is a sought-after beauty expert, having written for a number of magazines, including NZ Beauty, Headway, Mindfood, M2 Woman and Simply Beauty.

Kim has loved seeing the increase in entries from beauty therapists and can’t wait to see the talent in store this year.

 

Rebecca Brent – Owner, Willis York 

Rebecca Brent is one of New Zealand’s most influential hair colourists, with over twenty years of styling experience. With over ten years in the L’Oréal Professionnel artistic team she has carved out a niche for creative colour work and exceptional education seminars. By experimenting and pushing the boundaries with L’Oreal colour, she has majorly shaped the New Zealand colour scene with her hand painted pastel work, coined colour recipes and beautiful imagery.

Rebecca is the director/owner of iconic salon Willis York in Wellington. With a loyal following, Rebecca and the team at Willis York are renowned for inspirational hair work, as well as producing award winning, original thinking hair experts.

She continually gives back to the industry by hosting and curating fashion and design events and can’t wait to judge with this year’s panel.

 

Katrina Herbert – Owner, The Capital Barber 

Kat began her journey as a hairdressing apprentice at just 15 years old. After completing her qualification under the tutelage of David Bendell, she became a contractor stylist in the Wellington region, later opening her own salon in Petone. Kat thoroughly enjoyed hairdressing and the opportunities it offered, particularly training young professionals to help them gain their qualifications.

With a passion for cutting and styling men’s hair, Kat diversified her skills, training in barbering and men’s grooming in 2005 and positioning herself as senior barber at Monsignors Barber Shop. In 2015 Kat opened her own inner-city barber shop in Wellington, The Capital Barber, offering corporate professionals a first-class barbering experience. With both barbering and hairdressing under her belt, Kat is the perfect trainer to her apprentices.

Kat is looking forward to being part of the judging team and can’t wait to scout new talent.

 

Mana Dave – Blaze 

Mana Dave is an award-winning hairstylist and platform artist from Auckland. Mana loves the creativity and people focus of hairdressing, particularly his ability to make people look and feel good. He is the artistic director and owner of celebrated salon, Blaze, where he and his forward-thinking team are dedicated to training, upskilling, and mastering the latest trends.

His passion for hair colour and commitment to education and training has positioned him as a powerful figure in the hairdressing industry.

Owning two successful salon brands, Mana understands the significance of both technical skills and business acumen. For him, great hair colour is achieved through a good consultation and strategic colour placement.

Mana first joined the judging panel for the training awards last year and is excited to be returning again to see the ever-growing talent in our industries!

 

Entries close November 1! Make sure to follow us on Instagram and Facebook to stay up to date with the latest news from The Industry Awards.

Meet the 2021 Business judges

Entries into The Industry Awards 2021 are still being accepted until September 14, but while you’re working hard to create an awesome entry, you might be wondering how we select our winners.

Meet the judges for our business categories this year, who bring years of professional and practical experience in the industry. Stay tuned for further blogs introducing the judges for the creative barbering and training categories!

Audrey Hill – National Commercial Manager, Kérastase

Audrey has recently become the National Commercial Manager for Kérastase, after taking on numerous other roles in the L’Oreal Professional Products division for the past 19 years. For the first 14 years with L’Oréal she worked with Kérastase in a range of roles including Area Manager, Key Account Manager and Education Manager.

Audrey is passionate about working with salons to create the perfect client journey, to ensure the ultimate client experience and maximum profitability for the salon.







Seumus Cooney – New Zealand Regional Manager, Wella Professionals 

Seumus started out in the industry in 1994 working for Combined Salon Supplies. He spent two years gaining invaluable front line warehouse and logistics experience. Making a move into sales, he worked for IMM Corp. Ltd whose hero brand was Nioxin
 
A year later 
Seumus joined the Wella brand, and 2021 marks Seumus’s 23rd year with the company. During his time with Wella he’s had a number of roles, from Sales Consultant through to Senior Sales Consultant, Key Account Manager, and now for more than six years, New Zealand Regional Manager. He works with a wide number of brands including System Professional, Nioxin, Sebastian, SP, Wella Professionals and Clairol. 
 
Supporting 
training and capability has always been a priority for Seumus and he feels his involvement with The Industry Awards is another way to do that. Seumus has judged the business categories many times, so he brings years of judging experience to the panel. 
 
“I
 feel honoured to judge these awards and have an intimate view into just how exceptional our industry really is.”

Malcolm Gibbons – Business Coach, Salon Business Coach 

Malcolm’s introduction to the hairdressing industry was through working with a salon specific product supplier. For around ten years he helped salon owners with products, and providing business advice and in-salon training.

Malcolm then ventured into salon ownership. For over 16 years he worked to triple the floor space of his flagship salon, added spa services and increased revenue by over 470% per week – all whilst buying, building and selling another salon and owning a computer and software supply company.

He’s been successfully coaching hair and beauty salons in sales growth, service delivery, time management, culture change and all other aspects of salon business ownership for over ten years. Malcolm also delivers regular business changing ‘salon owner retreats’ offshore and works with salon owners locally and internationally.

Malcolm has been judging the business categories for The Industry Awards for several years, that combined with over 30 years experience in the industry makes him a real asset to the 2021 judging panel.

“I’m looking forward to judging the Industry Business Awards again as I never get tired of seeing the great results come in. The passion and quality that salon owners and their teams bring to ‘Doing Business’ is always a thrill and very inspiring.”

This year, we’ll be sharing expert advice from select judges on our socials and blog. Follow us on Instagram and Facebook to be the first to hear the advice they have to share!

Insights from one of the judges for the creative hairdressing awards, Carl Keely

Cathy Davys and Carl Keely interview

Cathy Davys recently interviewed Carl Keely, a New Zealander based in Melbourne, who has won over 200 awards with his team and is hairdressing royalty, plus an amazingly talented photographer! Carl is honoured to be one of the judges for the creative section of The Industry Awards 2021 to be held in November, with entries closing on 14 September 2021.

What is your advice for entrants?

The stuff that comes out of New Zealand is just exciting. You should definitely have a goal in mind, in this case The Industry Awards is an excellent goal.

Take the time to create a mood board based on research, where you think things are going and what you think you have to offer. Then really refine that mood board with your sequence of shots, your models, your practice work and really working your team to keep them all on the same page.

On the day, everyone needs to know exactly what you’re wanting to achieve and how to get the desired outcome, because on the day of the shoot, there's a lot of pressure and you don't want to be making things up on the day under pressure. That is my main piece of advice and as a photographer, I'm super strict with that. There's a lot of time pressure. There's a lot of money pressure. There's a lot of people looking at you as the hairdresser and if you don't have the ability to produce it right then it gets stressful.

What about for stylists just starting out?

I did my first photographic competition as a hairdresser in 1989 in Auckland and I didn't have any funds. I had a fantastic employer that was backing me, and we found a student photographer and we had a client that looked like she could do a bit of modelling. You know, we sort of just cobbled it together and I either came second or won it, I don’t quite remember.

I then thought, I can do this. You’ve just got to start. And luckily now you’ve got phones, you know - I'm a dinosaur, so back in those days we had film. There was no feedback on the day. It was, take the photo and hope for the best. Now I can see if we’ve got an image or not immediately.

These days if you've got an iPhone you can start shooting. You can start to train your eye.
What looks good on camera is not the same as what looks good in real life. There's a really big difference. You've got to change gears and change brains to feed the camera what it needs.
And the iPhone is perfect. You know it costs you nothing to take a shot.

What are you looking for when judging?

I'm looking for hair. I know that sounds like a really boring answer but I'm looking for the best hairdresser, I want to see interesting hair. Exciting hair. I've been a hairdresser since 1988. I've seen a lot of hair. I still get excited when I see someone create really good hair. I really want to look, and be interested to look even further and spend longer exploring what's been created.

Obviously, model selection is massive. The better the model the better the chance. You can have fantastic hair, a fantastic model and you're pretty much on the way there because the person taking the photo doesn't have to do anything. It's just all there in front of them.

I always start with the hair. Interesting concepts, interesting shape, texture, colour, balance - the normal things we look for in the salon every day.

I want to see something that explores and celebrates our craft. I want to sense the amount of workmanship that's gone into that hair and appreciate that. I want to see something that's like - Wow that's amazing.

If you get me or any other judge thinking to themselves, how did they do that? Then you’re a step closer to picking up that trophy.

We want to be intrigued by the hair and of course it's got to be beautiful and beautiful comes in many many costumes. It doesn't have to be traditionally beautiful. It can be different-beautiful. It can be alternate-beautiful. There's got to be something in there though that catches the eye and makes you want to look further.

I don't want to see the photographer or the retoucher. I don't want to see that hand being played. I have a lot of people asking how much photoshop and compositing of hair goes on. Honestly, there's a lot, you know, a lot goes on behind the scenes and I don't like it necessarily. I don't do a lot of photo manipulation of hair. If it's not good hair, I'm not going to make good hair in photoshop for you. That's just a rule. If you can't produce on the day, it's not going to happen.

You should never turn to the photographer and say, can you fix this in post? Can we do this or do that? My answer is no. If you can't do the hair, you don't deserve to win. It's about the hairdresser creating, otherwise to me it's cheating.

It doesn't mean we don't clean up skin and enhance a few things but I'm not putting a different half a head of hair on someone.

Competing is part of the journey. It takes a long time to make a great hairdresser. Competitions are one of the ways you can speed things up. Get yourself out there yourself. Be seen, get some feedback. Whether it's good or bad, I learn more from losing than winning.

Where do you get your inspiration?

Back in the day we used to have magazines and that's not a thing anymore. But I have magazines that are very old. I used to collect Italian Vogue for decades. I've got piles of them. I have a large archive of photographic work from hairdressing. Both my wife and I will pick up things and save things on our phone and digital archives and we'll share those back to the team.

Obviously, fashion is a thing. It's hard right now. There's not a lot going on but music is probably the biggest mover. So, if you're watching and consuming music, you're basically understanding culture today. I consume a lot of music videos and audio and I consume a lot of music outside of my normal playlist. So I get a lot of inspiration that way.

If you want to watch Cathy and Carl's chat, head over to The Industry Awards Instagram page, where we'll be posting the highlights in a five part series!

Introducing the 2021 Creative Hair judges

Entries into The Industry Awards 2021 are still being accepted until September 14, but while you’re working hard to create an awesome entry, you might be wondering how we select our winners.

Our judges come from a wide variety of backgrounds and bring a wealth of experience across the hair, beauty and barbering industries. We have some experienced Industry Awards judges back on board this year and we’re also welcoming some brand new judges.

First up, we’ll be introducing the judges for our creative hairdressing categories. Stay tuned for further blogs introducing the judges for the creative barbering, training and business categories

Sally Brooks

Sally is co-owner of Brooks & Brooks salon in Holborn, London, along with Jamie Brooks. She’s won some 60 awards with her creative team including London Hairdresser of the Year three times. Sally was named British Hairdresser of the Year at the British Hairdressing Awards in 2017, 2018, and 2020, and was the first female hairdresser to be nominated for and win the title since 2006. She was also named as the Fellowship for British Hairdressing’s Hairdresser of the Year for 2019/2020.

Sally loves simplicity with a twist, enjoying not only the end result, but the thought process behind it. Creating something that looks simple but is actually difficult is what challenges Sally; trying to be original and challenging herself is what keeps her inspired. Being satisfied with “just OK” is never an option. Sally and Jamie’s philosophy has always been simple, love your job, love your clients and strive to be the best you can.

 

Carl Keely

Originally from New Zealand, Carl travelled the world before settling in Melbourne and founding his salon group Chumba, with his wife Belinda Keeley in 2003. As the dual head of Chumba, their teams have won in excess of 200 awards including multiple Hair Expo and AHFA trophies.

As an industry educator Carl has toured the world and continues to teach and educate the industry. Finding a passion and panache for photographic work, Carl explored life behind the lens and quickly began racking up awards both in Australia and internationally.

With a passion for mentoring the next hair generation, Carl continues to look for talent to bring into the spotlight. Carl enjoys the varied work hairdressing has provided, but what Carl enjoys most of all is the one day a week he spends on the salon floor.

 

Richard Kavanagh

New Zealand born Richard Kavanagh, left school at the age of 15 and was told “you will not amount to anything boy.” Richard is now a five time Australian Session Stylist of the Year recipient, having styled cover shoots, celebrities, hair shows and fashion shows in a session career any hairdresser could only dream of, spanning over two decades and traversing the globe.

Thanks to his mum who wanted Richard to do an apprenticeship, he has had his skill and trade qualifications to lean on in an industry that is always evolving.

Richard’s tips to aspiring stylists; “Get really good at the basics. Be flexible. Pay attention to everything, and smile.”

 

Lex Buckley

Lex Buckley, together with partner Sheryl, are the publishers of the well-known and well-read Images Magazine. Now in its 20th year, Images has earned an international reputation and was awarded an Intercoiffure Global Press Award Paris in 2009.

Lex says; “With a keen interest in photography, I have an eye for the ‘money shot’ which is stunning enough for a magazine editorial or front cover. My focus while judging the submitted images this year will be on the total look and feel of the shot; for example, does it tell a story? Is it visually exciting?”

This will be Lex’s sixth year judging the Editorial Stylist of the Year awards – as a stalwart of the industry and with a keen eye for detail, we’re excited to have him on board again this year and we truly value his experience and support.

4 tips to help you create an award-winning entry

Diana Beaufort is the former owner of award-winning salon Reds Hairdressing, and after winning New Zealand Hair Salon of the Year in 2011, Excellence in Marketing in 2019 and Industry Assessor of the Year in 2020, she’s got some great tips on creating an award winning entry. Check out what she has to say about entering The Industry Awards:

Why enter The Industry Awards?

I'm not going to lie, it takes a lot of time and effort. However, winning an award has so many benefits and an immediate impact. For me, entering has been a valuable process that allowed me to involve my team in understanding and celebrating what makes our business truly special.

Our clients love being part of an award-winning salon and sharing in our unique story. Reds Hairdressing has been incredibly fortunate to have won many awards over the years, so how did we achieve such a high strike rate? It starts with a great entry.

Here are my top tips to create an award-winning entry.

1. Plan, plan, plan!

The best written entry won’t make it if there are no outstanding results to back it up. My first ever entry did not make the cut, but the win for me was in defining the areas I needed to focus on to create a great entry for next time.

The real gold here, of course, is that by knowing where to focus, your business results will improve significantly. The next year we entered and won the New Zealand Hair Salon of the Year award.

Reds Hair Win - 2011
Diana collecting the award for NZ Hair Salon of the Year for Reds Hairdressing, in 2011.

2. Tell a great story

Writing about your business gives you an opportunity to show your personality and tell your unique story in a way that takes the reader on a journey. Embrace the opportunity to show where you have come from and what you have achieved.

Of course, facts and figures are needed to back this up, so make sure to present them in an engaging way.

3. Answer the question

It sounds obvious, but in the process of crafting your entry the original question can be forgotten. Some key things to remember are:

  • Really take the time to understand what is being asked.
  • Be specific and clear in your answer.
  • Use facts, graphs or photos to back this up. If you use Kitomba, you’ll find Benchmark is excellent for this.
  • If there is a word count, adhere to it, try not to ‘waffle’. Think of it as an essay, after all it is what you are being judged on.
  • Make sure you answer every question, sometimes the difference between winning and not winning is a matter of only a few points. Failing to answer the question could make or break your entry.
The Reds Hairdressing team collecting the Excellence in Marketing award in 2019.
The Reds Hairdressing team collecting the Excellence in Marketing award in 2019.

4. Focus your message

Once you have finished your entry go back and focus your main message.

  • Are there unnecessary words in there? How can you make your message simple and clear?
  • Is it easy to read and beautifully presented in a way that communicates your message and reflects your brand?
  • Can you add testimonials or statistics to back up your entry?

It can pay to engage a copywriter to refine your entry. If you win, the benefits will far outweigh the cost.

Entries to The Industry Awards 2021 are open now, so check out the award categories and don’t forget to think about these tips when you’re completing your entry. Good luck!

Diana collecting her award for Industry Assessor of the Year in 2020.
Diana collecting her award for Industry Assessor of the Year in 2020.

Diana Beaufort is the former owner of Reds Hairdressing and recently founded Propel Coaching to help other businesses achieve success. If you're interested in making your business more profitable, improving your systems and processes or building a vibrant business culture, check out Propel Coaching.

The Industry Awards are back for 2021!

The Industry Awards team are thrilled to announce our return for 2021.

After a challenging 2020, we’re very much looking forward to celebrating the passion, drive, and creativity in our industries.

Location

Just like last year, The Industry Awards will be in Auckland.

Every year we strive to make our event better than the last and this year is no exception. So get your glam squad ready for the biggest celebration yet!

New creative categories

We’re so excited to be introducing five new barbering categories to this year’s Awards, as well as a new Patrick Cameron Instagram Challenge for teams!

We can’t wait to see more of the top talent within New Zealand’s barbering community.

The new categories are:

  • Editorial Barber of the Year
  • Editorial Barber of the Year – Hot Shot New Talent
  • Editorial Barber of the Year – Next Generation
  • Barber Hairt Instagram Challenge – Senior
  • Barber Hairt Instagram Challenge – Next Generation
  • Patrick Cameron Instagram Challenge – Team Challenge

Entry fees

Our entry fees are the same as last year. Here’s a reminder of how they work:

  • There’s different entry fees for individuals and for businesses (business categories include salons, spas, shops and workplaces).
  • You can choose to enter either one category, or multiple categories.
  • If you choose to enter multiple categories, you’re welcome to enter a mix of Business, Training and Creative categories.

Please note: students and HITO apprentices do not pay an entry fee.

Entry fees for individuals:

  • One category: $99+GST
  • Multiple categories: $199+GST

Entry fees for businesses:

  • One category: $149+GST
  • Multiple categories: $249+GST

How to enter

Entering is easy, just follow these steps:

  1. Download entry forms
    Check out the award categories and download the entry forms here for each category you’d like to enter.
  2. Complete the entry forms
    Read the entry requirements and judging criteria so you can get to work on creating an award-winning entry!
  3. Send us your entries
    Send in your entries to: The Industry Awards Team, Level 2, 107 Customhouse Quay, Wellington, 6011, along with completed entry forms. Entries must be received by 31 August 2021.
  4. Pay
    Pay your entry fees here. Payments must be made by 3rd September. If you require an alternative payment method, please contact us at info@industryawards.co.nz.

Finalist announcement

Follow The Industry Awards on Facebook or Instagram, so you’re the first to hear about our finalists. They’ll be announced by the end of September 2021, so stay tuned!

Join us at The Industry Awards

The winners of the Awards celebration will be announced on 7 November in Auckland.
To keep up to date with news and announcements, please check our website or follow us on Instagram or Facebook.

A day with Patrick Cameron: Danelle’s experience

Monday February 15th, 2021 will go down as one of the best days of my hairdressing career! After finishing runner up in the 2020 Patrick Cameron Instagram Challenge - Senior award it was an amazing surprise to be offered the prize of a day with Patrick Cameron himself, after the winner wasn’t able to make it!  Patrick kindly extended the invitation to my husband Karl upon finding out he was a hairdresser as well, so we both winged our way to New Plymouth. What an amazing opportunity to spend a day with an industry icon like Patrick and talk shop, careers, hair etc!

The day started with a guided tour around Patrick’s “forever home” situated in a gated community 10 minutes south of New Plymouth. The awesome architecturally designed house sits on a cliff top with a panoramic view of the open ocean and the wild Taranaki coastline with its black sand. Patrick usually spends ten months of the year in London and two months in NZ.

After the tour we were placed like stunned rabbits under the bright lights of his media room as we were introduced to his huge online following while he advertised his upcoming online look and learn show for the UK! Patrick, due to Covid19, has moved to remote teaching through online platforms and social media.

Then for the rest of the day we did hair in Patrick’s studio. For those that do not know, Patrick is a long hair guru! All he does is long hair, not cutting or colouring, but the art of dressing long hair for all occasions.

Altogether we did six styles on our mannequins, four in the morning and two in the afternoon. In between, we stopped for an amazing lunch prepared by Patrick’s multi-talented husband. Chilling, eating and chatting with the million-dollar view as a backdrop.

How often do you get a chance to spend a day with an industry icon like Patrick Cameron? I have told my clients that if it were in a charity auction, I would have happily paid between $5,000- $10,000 for the experience. But all NZ hairdressers need to do is enter! Find a beautiful model, do some “Patrick style” hair and take some shots with your phone. It must be the best prize and the easiest to enter t in the whole NZ hair industry!

A mega big thanks to Patrick, NZARH and The Industry Awards for making it happen.

Danelle Radel

Klone Hair

 

Danelle Radel was the runner up in the Patrick Cameron Instagram Challenge - Senior award. She is also co-owner and senior stylist at Dunedin Salon, Klone Hair. In her 20 years of experience in the industry, she has won many local and international awards. Check out her and her team’s work on the Klone Hair website.

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